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Discussion Starter #1
I have been thinking about relocating my battery under the bed.
and I was just wondering if anybody had any input or pictures. I know that Josh sells a battery relocate kit. But honestly just can't afford it right now so was trying to do a cheap relocate for now.
 

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First step is figuring out how/where your going to mount it. Ruslow us to make a tray that went where the spare tire was but to find one of those your probably going to pay close to what Josh's relocation kit cost alone. Personally I'll make my own try and mount it to the outside of the passenger side of the frame towards the rear. I do have Josh's kit and I can tell you that while its a bit pricey its works every single penny with the quality that is there.
 

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First step is figuring out how/where your going to mount it. Ruslow us to make a tray that went where the spare tire was but to find one of those your probably going to pay close to what Josh's relocation kit cost alone. Personally I'll make my own try and mount it to the outside of the passenger side of the frame towards the rear. I do have Josh's kit and I can tell you that while its a bit pricey its works every single penny with the quality that is there.
Any more info on Josh's kit? sorry im a newb
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Trust me I know Josh's Kit is worth every penny I got his fan kit ,I got his line lock kit ,I got his fuel pump wiring kit ,I love his work it looks so clean and works really well .
he does a great job but right now I don't have the coin and would like to move the battery back and maybe later upgrade this stuff to his.
And I was going to build my own bracket or buy a weld in bracket from Summit or Jegs for like 40 bucks. And it would mount to the frame I think you're right on the passenger side would be best.
And what I was really trying to find out is like for instance can I just ground the battery at the back and the Ground Terminal at the front on the frame and just run a power all the way to the front and it will work.
Or do I need to run a ground and power all the way to the front.
And I've also heard horror stories about if it's not done a certain way it will short out the alternator and fry it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
First step is figuring out how/where your going to mount it. Ruslow us to make a tray that went where the spare tire was but to find one of those your probably going to pay close to what Josh's relocation kit cost alone. Personally I'll make my own try and mount it to the outside of the passenger side of the frame towards the rear. I do have Josh's kit and I can tell you that while its a bit pricey its works every single penny with the quality that is there.
Any more info on Josh's kit? sorry im a newb
I cannot give you details on the battery relocate kit .
but I can tell you that all his other kits are pretty much Plug and Play and is extremely clean work and he pays real good attention to detail and he stands behind his work.
 

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Worlds Fastest Street HD Truck
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So if you go with a "cheap" relocate, you're trading off some things. And IMO, those tradeoffs do not warrant the cost savings, whether you get my kit or not, I'd recommend either doing it the right way, or keeping the battery up front and not doing it at all. And the "right" way isn't necessarily buying my kit, but wiring it up exactly like my kit because that's the proper way to do it. When you get to that point though, you'll see it's more expensive than most realize even to DIY, that you'll almost spend as much as you would to just buy my kit all done and plug & play and have a fraction of the install time.

No matter what you'll need a battery tray, and gambino sells really nice ones for under the bed (IIRC under 200 shipped), or you can get a battery box for the bed.

While many assume relocating is nothing more than extending a power cable back & grounding the battery to the frame, that setup is 1. unsafe, 2. not tech legal, 3. going to cause some electrical gremlins from poor grounding.

1. unsafe? because the battery should be fused as close as possible to the battery, so if you have a short somewhere in that cable run, you're protected from a short across an unfused battery. Factory has a fusible link, but you can't just move the fusible link to the back, because you need to step up AWG for the added length to offset the voltage drop of the longer run. So you need to add in the proper fusing when you relocate

2. tech legal? if the battery is relocated, you need a cutoff switch to remain tech legal. Some don't care, but it actually is nice having even if you don't track much, because you've got a quick cutoff source if you're doing other mods, just hit the cutoff switch and the battery is isolated. It's also good for long term storage so the battery isn't draining while sitting. I also offer a kit that is cheaper than my tech legal one though, that doesn't incorporate the cutoff switch wiring to save a few bucks

3. gremlins? Our trucks are very susceptible to grounding issues. Using the frame as a ground is okay, but for the primary power source it's not good enough. The frame rail isn't continuous 1 piece of metal, there's rivets and joints, then the body is mounted and has some ground straps, etc., then firewall body panels have seam sealer and bonding spots not full welds. So by the time you get from the PCM that's grounded to the firewall, thru the body to frame ground straps, thru the frame rail, thru the frame rivets, to the rear frame, back to your battery, it's not a clean ground path. I've troubleshot several DIY relocation setups, that simply by adding a dedicated ground from the battery all the way up to the front, 100% resolved electrical gremlins they could never figure out. And those gremlins aren't consistent either. Sometimes it'd all be fine, other times they'd appear. Solid grounding and a dedicated ground cable from the battery, all the way to the firewall is a must.

To expand on those main items, if you have a cutoff switch, it also needs to be wired correctly. It's not just a switch in-line of the power source. Because if you hit it while the truck is running, the battery is disconnected, but the alternator is not, and now the alternator is running and powering the truck, so the truck doesn't actually shut off, but the battery is isolated. That does you no good. Depending how you isolate the alt, that can also damage the alt, because there's a voltage spike when the switch is hit and interrupts all that power draw. That voltage spike can damage the diodes in the alt. To avoid this, you need to run the alt cable back to the battery side of the kill switch. That's another cable that most don't think about.

Then just for ease of maintenance, if you ever need a jump, it's a PITA to get to a battery under the bed. Mounting up a set of aux posts with aux cables is another helpful peice that most forget about until they're in the middle of it.

Then there's the materials. 1/0 AWG cable isn't cheap. Welding cable is great because it's flexible from the high strand count and prices are fair, but you'll need more than you think to do the kit wired up properly.

Also on lugs, you want a closed end, tin plated lug, so they won't oxidize. Oxidation degrades the connections, increases the resistance, and as I said, voltage issues are tough on these trucks. You want a 100% sealed connection. Exposed copper strands will oxidize over time and degrade. Now when you're talking closed end lugs, you also want to hydrauically crimp the lugs. Purely soldering is not ideal, as high current draw can melt the solder, and I guarantee you most methods of soldering lugs will end up with a cold solder joint, not a true wicking solder connection. You can back solder a crimped joint, but melting a glob of solder in a closed lug then dunking a cold stranded cable into it will not yield a good solder joint, it's a cold solder. So unless you already have the tools, a hydraulic crimper is another expense to factor in.

And you want it to look nice. Techflex is cheap, but it's work, but it really finishes the look off. But that does require fully installing your kit, cutting to length, fully removing your kit, crimping, then sleeving, then re-installing. I'm about as proficient as you can get with wiring mods, and when I DIY a kit myself from scratch, with all the resources, tools, and materials on hand, it still takes an easy 6+ hours to do an entire battery relocation kit from scratch.....since you are basically installing it twice, to get lengths, cut, remove, crimp, sleeve, reinstall. My kit is already done, already crimped & sleeved, already to length, the lugs are labeled which connection they go to, so you just start bolting away and routing the cable that's already done. You can install one in <2 hrs, where a DIY for the average person on a full relocation kit will likely take a full day to be done in the same manner making it safe, legal, & reliable.


So again, if you're going to DIY, there's a bunch of helpful information to consider, not just going to say get my kit or go scratch, but I'd definitely reconsider it. I know it's pricey, but I get to that price by adding up all the materials involved, figuring how much it would cost a DIY'er to build 1 w/ buying quantities for just 1 kit, and I add a bit for my labor. For my kits I order supplies from 5 different vendors, that's shipping charges from 5 different places. IIRC material costs are $400 to build 1 kit with the same materials. Figure you're only spending another ~175-200 more to get mine, all done, a fraction of the install time, proven design, color directions, it's usually worth the extra 200 bucks. I make it worth my time by buying my stuff in bulk, so I'm not getting shipping charges 5x for 1 kit, it's spread across getting things for multiple at a time, and there's quantity discounts on buying things in bulk. So it's still worth my while, while still trying to get a fair price out. It does seem high at first, but when you look at everything you get, and the quality of it, it quickly becomes obvious.

It's the most expensive item I build, and I've had that sticker shock response quite a bit, but every single time after people open the 30 lb box of materials, they message me back going holy crap, this by far exceeded my expectations lol. I mean I include everything down to the clamps & screws to secure the cables. Even the 18 pages of color directions with step by step install I probably have 10+ hours into writing those. You really get what you pay for.


For other folks new to this.....I've got cable kits for stock battery location that upgrades positive, negative, alternator, & ground cables, then I've got relocation kits for non-tech legal (no cutoff switch wiring), and relocation kits for tech-legal (cutoff switch wiring).

Few pics attached...
 

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Carbon Fiber Addict
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Here's what the Ruslow Tray and HDC kit look like without the bed and wires tucked from the engine bay. Ran the cables through the frame rails and into the cab.


 

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This is so impressive. I relocated the battery in my Mach 1 and havnet been able to drive the car normally since. I cant start it when its hot. From what I just read, I need to run a ground back up to the front of the car.
I would have MUCH rather purchased a well thought out kit like this 1000 times over. The amount of money and time I have into it just is not worth it.
 

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Wile E. Coyote, Super Genius!
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This is so impressive. I relocated the battery in my Mach 1 and havnet been able to drive the car normally since. I cant start it when its hot. From what I just read, I need to run a ground back up to the front of the car.
I would have MUCH rather purchased a well thought out kit like this 1000 times over. The amount of money and time I have into it just is not worth it.

I agree. Relocating the battery to the back is on my to-do list, just not at the top. More like bottom-of-the-barrel. Because I hate wiring, no matter how nice the kit is. I want to do gauges on the pillar as well, but my hate of wiring will forever keep me from doing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So if you go with a "cheap" relocate, you're trading off some things. And IMO, those tradeoffs do not warrant the cost savings, whether you get my kit or not, I'd recommend either doing it the right way, or keeping the battery up front and not doing it at all. And the "right" way isn't necessarily buying my kit, but wiring it up exactly like my kit because that's the proper way to do it. When you get to that point though, you'll see it's more expensive than most realize even to DIY, that you'll almost spend as much as you would to just buy my kit all done and plug & play and have a fraction of the install time.

No matter what you'll need a battery tray, and gambino sells really nice ones for under the bed (IIRC under 200 shipped), or you can get a battery box for the bed.

While many assume relocating is nothing more than extending a power cable back & grounding the battery to the frame, that setup is 1. unsafe, 2. not tech legal, 3. going to cause some electrical gremlins from poor grounding.

1. unsafe? because the battery should be fused as close as possible to the battery, so if you have a short somewhere in that cable run, you're protected from a short across an unfused battery. Factory has a fusible link, but you can't just move the fusible link to the back, because you need to step up AWG for the added length to offset the voltage drop of the longer run. So you need to add in the proper fusing when you relocate

2. tech legal? if the battery is relocated, you need a cutoff switch to remain tech legal. Some don't care, but it actually is nice having even if you don't track much, because you've got a quick cutoff source if you're doing other mods, just hit the cutoff switch and the battery is isolated. It's also good for long term storage so the battery isn't draining while sitting. I also offer a kit that is cheaper than my tech legal one though, that doesn't incorporate the cutoff switch wiring to save a few bucks

3. gremlins? Our trucks are very susceptible to grounding issues. Using the frame as a ground is okay, but for the primary power source it's not good enough. The frame rail isn't continuous 1 piece of metal, there's rivets and joints, then the body is mounted and has some ground straps, etc., then firewall body panels have seam sealer and bonding spots not full welds. So by the time you get from the PCM that's grounded to the firewall, thru the body to frame ground straps, thru the frame rail, thru the frame rivets, to the rear frame, back to your battery, it's not a clean ground path. I've troubleshot several DIY relocation setups, that simply by adding a dedicated ground from the battery all the way up to the front, 100% resolved electrical gremlins they could never figure out. And those gremlins aren't consistent either. Sometimes it'd all be fine, other times they'd appear. Solid grounding and a dedicated ground cable from the battery, all the way to the firewall is a must.

To expand on those main items, if you have a cutoff switch, it also needs to be wired correctly. It's not just a switch in-line of the power source. Because if you hit it while the truck is running, the battery is disconnected, but the alternator is not, and now the alternator is running and powering the truck, so the truck doesn't actually shut off, but the battery is isolated. That does you no good. Depending how you isolate the alt, that can also damage the alt, because there's a voltage spike when the switch is hit and interrupts all that power draw. That voltage spike can damage the diodes in the alt. To avoid this, you need to run the alt cable back to the battery side of the kill switch. That's another cable that most don't think about.

Then just for ease of maintenance, if you ever need a jump, it's a PITA to get to a battery under the bed. Mounting up a set of aux posts with aux cables is another helpful peice that most forget about until they're in the middle of it.

Then there's the materials. 1/0 AWG cable isn't cheap. Welding cable is great because it's flexible from the high strand count and prices are fair, but you'll need more than you think to do the kit wired up properly.

Also on lugs, you want a closed end, tin plated lug, so they won't oxidize. Oxidation degrades the connections, increases the resistance, and as I said, voltage issues are tough on these trucks. You want a 100% sealed connection. Exposed copper strands will oxidize over time and degrade. Now when you're talking closed end lugs, you also want to hydrauically crimp the lugs. Purely soldering is not ideal, as high current draw can melt the solder, and I guarantee you most methods of soldering lugs will end up with a cold solder joint, not a true wicking solder connection. You can back solder a crimped joint, but melting a glob of solder in a closed lug then dunking a cold stranded cable into it will not yield a good solder joint, it's a cold solder. So unless you already have the tools, a hydraulic crimper is another expense to factor in.

And you want it to look nice. Techflex is cheap, but it's work, but it really finishes the look off. But that does require fully installing your kit, cutting to length, fully removing your kit, crimping, then sleeving, then re-installing. I'm about as proficient as you can get with wiring mods, and when I DIY a kit myself from scratch, with all the resources, tools, and materials on hand, it still takes an easy 6+ hours to do an entire battery relocation kit from scratch.....since you are basically installing it twice, to get lengths, cut, remove, crimp, sleeve, reinstall. My kit is already done, already crimped & sleeved, already to length, the lugs are labeled which connection they go to, so you just start bolting away and routing the cable that's already done. You can install one in <2 hrs, where a DIY for the average person on a full relocation kit will likely take a full day to be done in the same manner making it safe, legal, & reliable.


So again, if you're going to DIY, there's a bunch of helpful information to consider, not just going to say get my kit or go scratch, but I'd definitely reconsider it. I know it's pricey, but I get to that price by adding up all the materials involved, figuring how much it would cost a DIY'er to build 1 w/ buying quantities for just 1 kit, and I add a bit for my labor. For my kits I order supplies from 5 different vendors, that's shipping charges from 5 different places. IIRC material costs are $400 to build 1 kit with the same materials. Figure you're only spending another ~175-200 more to get mine, all done, a fraction of the install time, proven design, color directions, it's usually worth the extra 200 bucks. I make it worth my time by buying my stuff in bulk, so I'm not getting shipping charges 5x for 1 kit, it's spread across getting things for multiple at a time, and there's quantity discounts on buying things in bulk. So it's still worth my while, while still trying to get a fair price out. It does seem high at first, but when you look at everything you get, and the quality of it, it quickly becomes obvious.

It's the most expensive item I build, and I've had that sticker shock response quite a bit, but every single time after people open the 30 lb box of materials, they message me back going holy crap, this by far exceeded my expectations lol. I mean I include everything down to the clamps & screws to secure the cables. Even the 18 pages of color directions with step by step install I probably have 10+ hours into writing those. You really get what you pay for.


For other folks new to this.....I've got cable kits for stock battery location that upgrades positive, negative, alternator, & ground cables, then I've got relocation kits for non-tech legal (no cutoff switch wiring), and relocation kits for tech-legal (cutoff switch wiring).

Few pics attached...
Yeah isn't your basic relocate kit like $570 or so and your drag kit with the kill switch a couple hundred dollars more
 

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Jeffv333
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Cable gauge and length eat up most of the costs. You’ll pay maybe $300 for cable and lugs probably.
 

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Worlds Fastest Street HD Truck
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I agree. Relocating the battery to the back is on my to-do list, just not at the top. More like bottom-of-the-barrel. Because I hate wiring, no matter how nice the kit is. I want to do gauges on the pillar as well, but my hate of wiring will forever keep me from doing it.
lol definitely consider my kit then if/when you are ready to do it. Every cable is done to length, every lug is labeled what it connects to, every lug is also sized exactly for the post/stud it's attaching to, and there's 18 pages of color directions included on top of it. Makes it more of any other "bolt-in" style mod, because there's really not much "wiring" actually involved when I do my plug & play style kits. Things plug in, or bolt together.

Yeah isn't your basic relocate kit like $570 or so and your drag kit with the kill switch a couple hundred dollars more
My drag relocation kit was 575 shipped. $30 of that is shipping/insurance. I had to bump my prices for 2019 to add in the pp fees because all the way up till now I've priced my stuff w/o including the pp fees in, because those go to nobody's pockets. It's added cost for the buyer, and I see none of it, so I would price my things excluding that and ask for the funds as a gift so nobody got wacked the fees. Or if someone didn't trust me, or wanted to put it on a CC, they could just add the fees in on their end. Unfortunately between people getting lazy because it's a couple extra clicks to send as a gift, or math to calculate the fee, or people not paying as close of attention since pp did recently shuffle how you go about sending as a gift so there's no fees, I started getting hit left and right when people thought they sent as a gift and didn't, so it was annoying having to go back and inform folks I got wacked with the fees, asking for $5 here, $10 there, $2 there. For one or two kits it's no big deal, for a lot of kits, it adds up thru the year. So I did adjust my prices for 2019 to include the fees in the pricing and folks can send it however they want, so my drag kits are now 592 shipped, because it's $17 in pp fees and I'll still get 575 shipped in the end. I'll still honor 575 on the drag kits so long as folks 100% send as a gift or cover the fees on their end.

You will need a cutoff switch with my drag kit. I don't include that in the kit because there's a TON of options. You can get a $20 cutoff switch, you can get $100 cutoff switch. It all depends on what exactly you want. Summit has them all. It's not adding a couple hundred dollars though, it's adding $20-$100 depending what brand/style/rating cutoff switch you want. My kit works with any of them. You'll also need a set of aux charge posts. My kit includes the wires for them, but not the posts. They're $10-$20 on summit. Again, there's different options, different brands, different mounting hole sizes, so depending how you're mounting them, and what brand you prefer, I leave that up to you folks. EVERYTHING else aside from the battery tray itself (because you can do a ruslow tray, a gambino tray, a custom tray, a bed box, a bed bracket, etc. and my kit works with all of them), so it's 1 stop shop for EVERYTHING needed to install the wiring kit, then an order from Summit to pick your cutoff switch & aux posts of choice, which if you're really crunched you can get for $50 or less.

My "street" relocation kit is cheaper, because there's no cutoff switch wiring. This shortens 1 of the cables in the kit by a substantial amount, so it's a little less wiring. It's been a while since I've done one of these because very few go this route (I've done around 6 "street" relocation kits, and probably close to 100 drag relocation kits), but I'd guesstimate it'd be about $50 cheaper than my drag kit. So you're talking $525 shipped ($540 w/ pp fees). You wouldn't need any cutoff switch so you also save there.


Cable gauge and length eat up most of the costs. You’ll pay maybe $300 for cable and lugs probably.
Exactly. Dump a big jar of change on the table, and the quarters are easy to add up, but the nickels & dimes add up fast when there's a bunch scattered on the table as well. Many don't add those "nickel & dime" pieces up though, and estimate the DIY version by only adding the "quarters", then they go to install and realize they didn't get all the "nickel & dimes".
Quick math, there's over 65 ft of cable in a kit, that also means over 65' of tech flex. There's 9 cables out of that, which means 18 lugs, and 18 pieces of large shrink tubing. And not the crap stuff, the dual wall, adhesive lined, chemical & moisture resistant heat shrink to seal the connections. There's also 6 cable boots, a 300 amp fuse holder, a fuse holder cover/protection kit, 2 300A fuses, a bag of vinyl coated clamps to route the cables, a bag of SS self tappers to mount those clamps, a set of gold plated battery terminal lugs, and also a set of lugs & heat shrink for re-terminating the starter cables that previously would have attached directly to the battery terminals with the battery up front. As mentioned all that stuff is from 5 different vendors, which is easily $50 in shipping alone between those various places. Then to have a pile of "stuff", and nothing assembled, and no directions to go by, now you've got several hours of building. If you don't have a hydraulic crimper, you'll also need to pick up one of those. It's not a mod folks can't do themselves, my point is there's just not as much cost savings as folks think there is. Not even factoring in the time savings, & time = money lol. You'll spend 6 hours or more installing long cable runs, cutting to length, un-installing, sleeving, crimping, shrink wrapping, then re-installing, vs. easily 2 hrs or less to bolt in a 100% completed kit with everything labeled right where it goes.,...or you can slap one together, not sleeve anything, etc. but it's not going to turnout anywhere near as nice. Suddenly that $150-$200 extra to just buy one 100% completed and install of a fraction of the time gets more appealing.

But heck I don't need to even tell folks that, just listen to folks that got the kit. I've never had someone ever come back to me or post up with any hint of buyers remorse that they kinda wished they saved the little extra money and did it from scratch themselves. I've had overwhelming feedback of "holy crap, i was not expecting this to be that nice, the pics do it no justice" types of responses lol.

And I make it worth my while to build these because I'm not just ordering stuff to do 1 at a time. Usually I'm getting enough for 5 or 10 at a time, which gets me bulk discounts, and also free shipping when buying 500' of cable at once, etc. And what shipping fees I do have, is now split across multiple kits, vs. all hit on 1 kit. It's a win-win. Keeps it worth my while as I do enjoy building these, but not as a charity LOL, and it also keeps things reasonable for folks where it's just not that much more expensive than DIY to try and duplicate the same quality, and it's a fraction of the install time since it's all done for you, you just bolt it up and you're done.


Anyway, pics below showing the difference in my "drag" kit and my "street" kit. As mentioned the drag kit incorporates the wiring for a cutoff switch so it's tech legal. The street kit does not, so there's a little less wiring involved. Let me know if you're interested in that instead. I built templates for all of these, so I can build them at any time, although like I said very few go the street kit route since it's not much more to add the tech-legal cutoff switch which also has benefits just for wrenching or storage with quick shutoff ability.
 

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10 second street truck
2001 Ford Lightning
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how or where can i buy one of these drag kits at
If you mean the wiring
Look up hdcircuitry on facebook. Or message josh on here. The guy who posted about them
 
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